The Excitement of New Ultrasound Technologies and Their Effects on Imaging-Guided Interventions

Recent advancements in ultrasound technologies have generated excitement in the field of ultrasound-guided intervention. For me, an interventional radiologist, these developments create new potential to perform needed procedures and a complementary approach to addressing our patients’ complex medical conditions. Further, benefits from these technologies include enabling us to achieve better patient outcomes, improve patient satisfaction, gain operational efficiencies, and improve stake holder’s satisfaction.azar_nami

The new technologies to which I’m referring are ultrasound contrast and ultrasound fusion. Ultrasound fusion is an element of artificial intelligence that combines the anatomic details of cross-sectional imaging like CT scan, PET scan, and MRI with the power of real-time ultrasound and is gaining more acceptance and popularity in medicine. Similar to a car’s GPS, ultrasound fusion helps a user find something. The powerful tool enables the operator to find lesions, which normally are difficult or even impossible to find on standard ultrasound. Needle navigation in the form of virtual tracking is a bonus that identifies needle location even when it is obscured by air or bone. It’s also a great teaching tool for inexperienced physicians who are interested in interventional radiology.

Ultrasound contrast is also emerging as a powerful tool in the field of interventional radiology. It enables the operator to better visualize a lesion and characterize the lesion and surrounding tissue. Now, we also can perform an ultrasound contrast sinogram to assess any cavity or catheter location, which opens new horizons in the field of ultrasound intervention, mainly in pediatric intervention.

An additional benefit for ultrasound contrast that it can be given without worrying about renal injury. This is very valuable when it comes to avoiding the toxic effect of iodinated contrast, especially in renal transplant intervention. Also, its very sensitivity to assess bleeding when compared with that of Doppler ultrasound. This technology allows us to discharge our patients home earlier after procedures when the contrast study is negative.

This is a very exciting time in the field of interventional radiology (IR). So many procedures that we could not perform using real-time ultrasound in the past now can be safely done with only ultrasound. Our patients appreciate how convenient it is. The procedures are done quickly, without the need to move the patient from their bed onto a stiff CT scan table. The lack of ionizing radiation in IR is also an attractive concept to the patient (mainly pediatric and/or pregnant), the clinician, and our IR staff.

Our institution is very supportive of utilizing advanced ultrasound technologies, as ultrasound allows us to gain operational efficiencies and is a more cost-effective alternative to CT-guided procedures. Operational efficiencies are gained by doing interventional cases portably with ultrasound, thus allowing the interventional CT suite to be utilized for diagnostic exams, which bring additional revenue to the institution. The ordering clinicians are also cognizant of radiation dose reduction, so providing an alternative to CT-guided procedures appeals to them.

Even though the implementation of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and fusion has been slower in the United States when compared with our colleagues abroad, it has brought a lot of excitement to my colleagues and me in interventional radiology. Like any new technology, the more we use, the more we appreciate its value. I predict they will become the new norm in daily practice. These advancements will continue to evolve and be an essential part of medicine.

 

Interested in reading more about contrast ultrasound? Check out the following posts from the Scan:

 

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Nami Azar, MD, MBA, is an Associate Professor of Radiology in the Department of Radiology at University Hospitals of Cleveland Medical Center in Ohio.

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