At the Intersection of Science, Engineering and Medicine

Flemming Forsberg PhDDuring the 2015 AIUM Annual Convention, AIUM sat down with Flemming Forsberg, PhD, recipient of the Joseph H. Holmes Basic Science Pioneer Award to talk about the award, his motivation, and the future of medical ultrasound. Here is what he had to say:

Question #1:
What was your reaction to being named the recipient of this award?

Question #2:
What motivates you?

Question #3:
What role does failure play?

Question #4:
How does the United States differ from the rest of the world when it comes to medical ultrasound?

Question #5:
Where do you see the future of medical ultrasound?


What do you see as the future of medical ultrasound? Where are there some additional intersections?
Comment below or let us know on Twitter: @AIUM_Ultrasound.

Flemming Forsberg, PhD, FAIUM, FAIMBE, received the 2015 Joseph H. Holmes Basic Science Pioneer Award from the AIUM. Dr Forsberg is Professor, Department of Radiology at Thomas Jefferson University. He also serves as Deputy Editor of the Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine.

5 Questions with Dr Lee

Every year, the AIUM William J. Fry Memorial Lecture Award recognizes an AIUM member who has significantly contributed in his or her particular field to the scientific progress of medical ultrasound.

Wesley Lee MDAt the 2015 AIUM Convention, Wesley Lee, MD received this award.

  1. What did being named the William J. Fry Memorial Lecture Award winner mean to you?

The William J. Fry Memorial Lecture Award was an unexpected surprise because all of my professional accomplishments simply reflect who I am and what I enjoy doing.  I am truly honored and feel privileged to have received this special recognition among my special friends and colleagues.

  1. You have been involved with the AIUM for more than 3 decades. From your perspective, how has the AIUM changed over that span?

Over the past 3 decades, I have seen enthusiastic growth within our membership and more diversified multidisciplinary collaborations between many specialties for various areas of diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasonography. The AIUM has certainly raised the bar for technical and clinical practice standards that are now often developed with other professional organizations. The AIUM plays an pivotal role for political advocacy involving important issues that may impact how cost-effective and health care is delivered.

  1. You have written extensively and currently serve on the editorial board for Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, as well as deputy editor of the Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine. Based on what you are seeing and writing, where is medical ultrasound headed?

The quality of medical ultrasound research has improved with the use of standard writing guidelines and detailed imaging protocols, as well as the application of evidenced-based medicine. We are seeing many novel applications of ultrasound technology that can now be delivered or used in combination with other imaging modalities in our patients. The Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine has become an important international resource with submissions from all over the world.  Original research articles constitute approximately 60% of the total papers submitted.

  1. What medical ultrasound question or concern keeps you up at night?

We use ultrasound imaging technology every day in our clinical practices. I am constantly trying to understand how diagnostic ultrasonography practice can be improved for patient care through development/application of new technologies, better education, and innovative research initiatives.

  1. Finish this sentence…”It’s best to use ultrasound first when…”

It’s best to use ultrasound first when providing obstetrical care to pregnant women because of its cost-effectiveness as a screening tool, established benefit for the prenatal diagnosis of fetal anomalies/complications, and long safety record in pregnant women.

Do you have any questions for Dr Lee? Comment below or let us know on Twitter: @AIUM_UltrasoundLearn more about the AIUM Awards Program at www.aium.org/aboutUs/awards.aspx.

Wesley Lee, MD, is Co-Director, Texas Children’s Fetal Center at Texas Children’s Hospital Pavilion for Women. He is also Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Section Chief, Women’s and Fetal Imaging; and Director of Fetal Imaging Research all at Baylor College of Medicine.

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I Enjoy Being a Detective

I chose the specialty of radiology, and subsequently diagnostic ultrasound, because I enjoy the “detective” aspect of medicine. It is exciting to use diagnostic imaging to attempt to determine the cause of a patient’s illness. Obstetrical ultrasound has been of interest because most pregnant patients are healthy and happy and one always got an answer, whether right or wrong, 20-30 weeks hence.

I began my career in ultrasound in 1976 joining Dr. Roy Filly at UCSF. He and I are still practicing (perhaps the longest pair in academic medicine). The early days of arguing whether it was better to view images as white on a black background or black on a white background and whether static articulated arm scanning was better than “real-time scanning” are long gone, replaced by incredible technology.

Peter CallenThe pitfalls of image analysis has been a curiosity of mine. I have always been intrigued as to how one looks at a series of images and achieves the right (or occasionally wrong) conclusion. I am thrilled that most medical centers are introducing diagnostic ultrasound to medical student teaching early in their training. This has helped generate a lot of awareness and better understanding of our specialty. I am proud to have been a member of our organization, the AIUM. While there are some that only know the AIUM for its guidelines, it has served as a strong core of support for our specialty for the past several decades with support and advice to and from ultrasound professionals, including physicians, sonographers, scientists, engineers, other healthcare providers, and manufacturers of ultrasound equipment. This award is especially meaningful to me to be included with the true founders and leaders of our specialty.

What is your story? Why did you start using ultrasound? Comment below or let us know on Twitter: @AIUM_Ultrasound.

Dr Peter Callen received the 2015 Joseph H. Holmes Clinical Pioneer Award from the AIUM. Dr Callen’s contributions span decades and he is currently Emeritus Professor of Radiology, Obstetrics, and Gynecology at the University of California, San Francisco.

Why I Applied to be an AIUM Fellow

Working in an academic department, we are encouraged to become involved in the ultrasound community as well as keep abreast of the constantly changing field of sonography. After attending my first AIUM Annual Convention early in my career, I quickly realized that the AIUM was an organization in which I wanted to become more involved. The knowledge base was high and many of the members were and still are leaders in research, clinical work and patient care. It was confirmation that I make an impact on patient outcomes every time I pick up a transducer.

TBpixAs a reflection of that, I wanted to grow in my AIUM membership. I took the first step in 2005 when I applied for senior membership status, which I was happy and proud to be awarded in the spring of 2006. It took me several years to take the next step, but after meeting the membership requirements, I applied to be an AIUM Fellow. It was a great feeling when I was notified that I had joined the exclusive ranks of AIUM Fellow.

Going through this process was both a professional and personal goal. It was and is an honor to be individually recognized by my peers on both a national and international level.

For those of you interested, the overall application process was straightforward and didn’t take a lot of time to complete. It was pretty clear and straightforward. Plus, the AIUM staff was excellent in keeping me updated on the process and deadlines. There were definitely times when I needed a reminder.

We are all busy with our professional and personal lives; however, I am excited and proud to have taken the steps to illustrate to myself and my peers how much I value my career in ultrasound. I appreciate the AIUM for identifying the substantial effort ultrasound professionals put forth daily for the accurate diagnosis and safety of patients.

What’s your membership story? What accomplishment are you most proud of? Comment below or let us know on Twitter: @AIUM_Ultrasound.

Teresa Bieker, MBA, RT, RDMS, RVT, RDCS, FAIUM, is Lead Diagnostic Medical Sonographer at the University of Colorado Hospital.

Only 260 AIUM members have applied and been granted the distinction of being an AIUM Fellow.