Bigger and Better in the Big Apple

Last week a near-record 1,500 physicians, sonographers, scientists, students, and educators from across the country and around the world gathered in New York City to network, share, and learn. It was, by all accounts, one of the biggest and best AIUM Conventions yet!

What it made so great? A variety of educational opportunities covering a wide range of topics addressing at least 19 different specialties is just the start. More interaction across disciplines to share techniques, more hands-on learning labs, new product releases, and collaborative learning events added to the excitement and collegiality.

If you were in New York City, we hope you shared your feedback in the follow-up surveys. If you were unable to make it this year, here are a few of the highlights:

New Offerings—As if putting on the AIUM Convention weren’t enough, we decided to make a host of changes. We doubled the number of hands-on learning labs (most sold out), we added the more intimate Meet-the-Professor sessions (again, most sold out), we enhanced networking by adding exhibit hall receptions, we brought back the mobile app to make navigating the event easier, and we invited our corporate partners to host Industry Symposia, which included education, networking, and food. Whew!

New Offerings

SonoSlam—In its third year, a record number of medical schools (21) sent teams to compete for the coveted Peter Arger Cup. This year’s winning team, F.A.S.T. and Furious, is from the University of Connecticut. They competed last year and had so much fun they returned and were triumphant! Save the date for next year—April 6. Big thanks to headline sponsor CoapTech.

SonoSlam 2018

Global Plenary—AIUM President Brian Coley, MD, hosted the Plenary session that featured a lecture on global health from John Lawrence, MD, President of the Board of Directors for Doctors Without Borders-USA. This was followed by Roberto Romero, MD DMedSci, who presented the William J. Fry Memorial Lecture on ultrasound imaging and computational methods to improve the diagnosis and care of pregnant women and their unborn children. The entire Plenary Session is available on the AIUM Facebook Page.

Social Media—This year was the most active social media convention ever for the AIUM. StatsFrom streaming live videos on Facebook to more than 754 individuals participating and sharing on Twitter (a 50% increase over last year), the social media scene was active and engaging.

Fun Activities—Not only was #AIUM18 educational, it was also fun. This year attendees could participate in a morning jog through Central Park; do a scavenger hunt with the AIUM app (Congrats to Offir Ben-David, RDMS, from Stamford, CT, and Jefferson Svengsouk, MD, MBA, RDMS, from Rochester, NY, for winning prizes by completing the scavenger hunt); network during 3 different AIUM receptions and the new Industry Symposia; and win prizes at the AIUM booth (Congrats to Jenna Rothblat who won a free 2019 AIUM Convention registration).

Fun Activities

Sold-out Exhibit Hall—This year’s exhibit hall was the most exciting and active it has ever been. At least 3 companies unveiled new ultrasound machines and several others shared their insights with live video feeds. Combine that with networking receptions and New York street fare at lunchtime, and the exhibit hall was always the place to be.

Award Winners—AIUM was proud to recognize the following award winners (look for upcoming blog posts and videos from some of these individuals):

Wesley Lee, MD, FAIUM—Joseph H. Holmes Clinical Pioneer Award

William D. Middleton, MD—Joseph H. Holmes Clinical Pioneer Award

Thomas R. Yellen-Nelson, PhD, FAAPM, FAIUM—Joseph H. Holmes Basic Science Pioneer Award

Tracy Anton, BS, RDMS, RDCS, FAIUM—Distinguished Sonographer Award

Alfred Abuhamad, MD, FAIUM—Peter H. Arger, MD Excellence in Medical Student Education Award

Creagh Boulger—Carmine M. Valente Distinguished Service Award

Rachel Liu—Carmine M. Valente Distinguished Service Award

Lexie Cowger—Carmine M. Valente Distinguished Service Award

Adriana Suely de Oliveira Melo, MD, PhD—AIUM Honorary Fellow

Simcha Yagel, MD, FAIUM—AIUM Honorary Fellow

E-poster winners—Every year, the AIUM supports an e-poster program. This year, a record number of abstracts were submitted and the AIUM recognized the following e-poster winners:

  • First place, Basic Science: Construction and Characterization of an Economical PVDF Membrane Hydrophone for Medical Ultrasound, presented by Yunbo Liu, PhD, from the FDA, Silver Spring, MD.
  • First place, Education: Investigation into the Role of Novel Anthropomorphic Breast Ultrasound Phantoms in Radiology Resident Education, presented by Donald Tradup, RDMS, RT, from Mayo Clinic-Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center-Department of Radiology, Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland.
  • First place, Clinical Science: Sonography of Pediatric Superficial Lumps and Bumps: Illustrative Examples from Head to Toe presented by Anmol Bansal, MD, Mount Sinai Hospital, Icahn School of Medicine.
  • Second place, Basic Science: Strain Rate Imaging for Visualization of Mechanical Contraction, presented by Martin V. Andersen, MS, from Duke University.
  • Second place, Education: Tommy HeyneSonography in Internal Medicine, Baseline Assessment (MGH SIMBA Study), presented by Tommy Heyne, MD, MSt, Massachusetts General Hospital-Department of Internal Medicine and Department of Emergency Medicine.
  • Second place, Clinical Science: Serial Cervical Consistency Index Measurements and Prediction of Preterm Birth < 34 Weeks in Twin Pregnancies, presented by Vasilica Stratulat, CRGS, ARDMS, MD, Sunnybrook Health Sciences.

Up and Comers—In addition to our national awards and our eposter winners, the AIUM also recognizes its New Investigators, which this year were sponsored by Canon.

Nonclinical
Winner— Ivan M. Rosado-Mendez, PhD, for “Quantitative Ultrasound Assessment of Neurotoxicity of Anesthetics in the Young Rhesus Macaque Brain.”

Clinical Ultrasound
Winner— Ping Gong, PhD, for “Ultra-Sensitive Microvessel Imaging for Breast Tumors:  Initial Experiences.”

Honorable Mentions
Juvenal Ormachea, MS,
for “Reverberant Shear Wave Elastography: Implementation and Feasibility Studies.”

Kathryn Lupez, MD, for “Goal Directed Echo and Cardiac Biomarker Prediction of 5-Day Clinical Deterioration in Pulmonary Embolism.”

2019

SonoSlam 2017

16SonoSlam_logoIf you attended the AIUM convention the past 2 years you may have heard mention of SonoSlam in passing. So what is it? SonoSlam is a medical student ultrasound competition and educational event. It was conceived as an idea to promote medical student ultrasound and was officially born in Orlando in 2015. A few members of the medical education committee were discussing how to get students more engaged in ultrasound at the national level. A national ultrasound student interest group had been formed and got behind the idea of nationalizing ultrasound activities for medical students. Many of us had been involved in regional events such as Ultrafest or had participated in Sonogames™, an emergency medicine resident ultrasound competition. As we brainstormed, SonoSlam came to fruition. We wanted this event to be more than a game, making sure to integrate education into the proceedings. Given the diversity of exposure to ultrasound in undergraduate medical education, the faculty wanted to ensure that this event would be appealing to students of all levels of experience. In addition, the unique offering of AIUM is that this event would be multidisciplinary. With these key components of education, competition, and a multidisciplinary approach SonoSlam was created. The inaugural SonoSlam was held in New York in 2016 with the winning team awarded the Peter Arger Cup, named after the famed radiologist who championed medical student ultrasound education at the AIUM. Seventeen teams from 12 different schools participated in this inaugural event with more than 30 faculty from across the country. This year in Orlando we grew to 23 teams from 17 schools from across the country—Oregon to New York to Florida and all in between. We had more than 50 faculty from a multitude of specialties, including emergency medicine, internal medicine, critical care, obstetrics and gynecology, radiology, and pediatrics. We plan to continue to host this event annually with the lofty goal of having representation from every medical school in the country. We hope to see you in New York March 24, 2018!

SonoSlam2017

For more information about SonoSlam or if you are interested in getting involved please email us: sonoslam@gmail.com.

Written by Creagh Boulger, Rachel Liu, and Dave Bahner. Creagh Boulger, MD, RDMS, FACEP, is Assistant Professor, Assistant Director of Ultrasound, and Assistant Fellowship Director of Emergency Ultrasound at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Rachel Liu, BAO, MBBCh, is Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine and Director of Point-of-Care Ultrasound Education at Yale University School of Medicine. Dave Bahner, MD, RDMS, FAIUM, FAAEM, FACEP, is Professor and Director of Ultrasound, Fellowship Director, Investigator, and Core Faculty at Ohio State University.

How do you make ultrasound education engaging? Do you have any ideas for bringing students from across the country together? Comment below or let us know on Twitter: @AIUM_Ultrasound.

AIUM Annual Convention Rocks NYC

aium16Last week, physicians, sonographers, scientists, and educators from across the country and around the world left New York City and the AIUM Annual Convention to return home. They left with new contacts, tips, tricks, techniques, research, technology, and information that will help them improve patient care. If you were unable to attend, or if you want to relive another amazing AIUM Annual Convention, here are the highlights as well as a summary of attendee feedback.

The Highlights

  • SonoSlamsonoslamIn its inaugural year, this student competition had 16 teams sign up to compete for the Peter Arger Cup. This year’s winning team, “Baby Don’t Hertz Me,” hails from The Ohio State University. Plans are already underway to increase this event next year.
  • Awesome Plenary—The ballroom was packed for the Opening Plenary session that featured an engaging talk by Alfred Abuhamad, MD, titled, “Global Maternal Health: Ultrasound and Access to Care.” Attendees also heard from William J. Fry Memorial Lecturer Dirk Timmerman, MD, PhD, FRCOG, on “Tips and Tricks of Successfully Ultrasound Studies.”
  • Sold-out Exhibit Hall—Spread over two floors, this year’s exhibit hall featured a wide variety of companies that collectively addressed nearly every ultrasound need. This year several exhibitors offered great deals and amazing drawings.
  • Ultrasound for Every Specialty—Attendees raved about the mix of specialty sessions throughout the Annual Convention. In fact, this year the content included sessions from 18 different ultrasound specialties.
  • Award Winners—AIUM was proud to recognize the following award winners (look for upcoming blog posts from these individuals):
    • Alfred Abuhamad, MD—Joseph H. Holmes Clinical Pioneer Award
    • Michael Kolios, PhD—Joseph H. Holmes Basic Science Award
    • Christian Fox, MD, RDMS—Peter Arger Excellence in Medical Student Education Award
    • Daniel Merton, BS, RDMS—Distinguished Sonographer Award
    • Aris Papageorghiou, MD—Honorary Fellow
    • Paul Sidhu, BSc, MBBS, MRCP, FRCR—Honorary Fellow
  • Social Media—This year was by far the most active year for #AIUM16 on social media. On Twitter alone there were double the number of impressions over last year, with nearly 500 people participating.
  • E-poster winners—Every year, the AIUM supports an epostere-poster program. This year, the winners were (look for upcoming videos from them):
    • First place:A Comparison Of Different Hydrophones In High Intensity Ultrasound Pressure Measurements by Yunbo Liu and Keith Wear
    • Second place: Sonographic Evaluation of Ligaments and Tendons of the Hands by Jonelle M. Thomas, Cristy Gustas, and Dylan Simmons.
    • Third place: Can You Give Me a Hand? Diagnosing and Understanding the Clinical Significance of Fetal Hand Anomalies in Obstetric Ultrasound by Karen Oh, Thomas Gibson, Kathryn Snyder, Ryan Meek, and Roya Sohaey.
    • Honorable Mention: The Neck is More than the Thyroid Alone: 3-D Ultrasound of Cervical Lymph Nodes, Salivary, and Parathyroid Glands, Palpable/Visible Abnormalities by Susan Judith Frank, David Gutman, and Tova Koenigsberg.
  • Up and Comers—AIUM recognized 4 outstanding papers in its New Investigator Program.
    • Basic Science Winner: Aiguo Han for Structure Function for Quantitative Ultrasound Tissue Characterization
    • Clinical Ultrasound Winner: Margaret Dziadosz for Uterocervical Angle: A Novel Ultrasound Marker to Predict Spontaneous Preterm Birth
    • Honorable Mention: Mahdi Bayat for Comb-Push Shear Elastography on a Clinical Ultrasound Machine: First Report on Differentiation of Breast Masses
    • Honorable Mention: Xueqing Cheng for Effect of Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Subacromial Bursography With Microbubbles for Assessment of Rotator Cuff Tears

We know that everyone has their own highlights from this event. If you want to share yours, please do so on Twitter @AIUM_Ultrasound.

The Feedback

The AIUM Annual Convention is the largest event supported by the organization. full sessionAs such, we realize that while most things go well and according to plan, some do not. Here then is
the feedback attendees have shared with the AIUM.

  • 94% said overall the Convention was Good or Excellent. This was the same as the past 2 years.
  • 56% of attendees said the registration and pre-registration process was Good or Excellent.
  • Nearly 90% of attendees said they would make at least some modification to how they practice ultrasound as a result of what they learned at the AIUM Annual Convention. This was up from the 70% that said the same last year.
  • 96% of attendees said they would recommend the AIUM Annual Convention to a colleague. Again, this was an increase over last year’s 91%.
  • 91% of attendees said the AIUM Convention was either on par or better than other ultrasound courses/events they have attended. This is another increase over last year’s 90%
  • More than 80% of attendees said it was highly likely they would attend another AIUM Annual Convention.

As for the areas that need more attention and work, here is where the pain points were:

  • Elevators—Some floors experienced long wait times for elevators. Several attendees expressed frustration at having to make choices based on how long the elevator would take. We completely understand and all hotel-related comments will be shared with the hotel staff.
  • Cost—This continues to be an issue and is one that the AIUM Executive Committee is taking very seriously. The AIUM is exploring a number of models and programs to help reduce the cost of attending this event.
  • Overlap of sessions—Many attendees shared that sessions they wanted to attend were overlapping. With such a diverse offering of sessions, this is bound to happen to some extent. This year, the AIUM did record all the lectures. We will be making them some of them available through the online communities and other available for CME credit. These videos will be released over the next couple of months.
  • Technological issues—Some presentations experienced technical difficulties. Much of this was related to the fact that our service provider was operating a newer version of software than most of our presenters were using. In the future, the AIUM will share that information with presenters in an effort to reduce these issues.

The Praise

Despite some of the hiccups, most attendees spoke glowingly of the 2016 AIUM Annual Convention. Here is just a sampling of the comments we received:

  • “The courses were excellent in OB/GYN — all fantastic!!!”
  • “Excellent sessions, great speakers, tremendous choice”
  • “The 30-minute lectures; presentation of cases. Lunch was great! Loved the special sessions.”
  • “I was very impressed with the content, subject matter, and quality of the presentations of the conference. I’d never planned to come to AIUM before and came only because it was close to where I practice. I will be back!”
  • “I am new to this field so was just excited to hear all the exciting work going on. I liked the size of the convention in general.”
  • “Seems culture is changing to become more welcoming of new ideas and collaborative.”
  • “The opportunity to learn ultrasound from multiple specialties with their different areas of focus and expertise. Courses run by speakers from multiple specialties provided different insights and perspectives.”
  • “Great people involved, SonoSlam was super fun, I enjoyed several of the didactic sessions.”
  • “The hands-on fetal echo course with Dr. Solomon was excellent. Wish I could work with her for several weeks.”
  • “I really liked that this conference could bring together many disciplines. I like the way the format was laid out by interest. Worked very, very well.”

The great thing about the Annual Convention is that we all learn. Attendees learn tips, techniques and resources that help them succeed and the AIUM learns how it can make this event even better. While the 2016 Annual Convention is over, we are already hard at work on the 2017 Annual Convention that will be held March 25-29 in Orlando.

Did you attend this year’s event? If so, share your thoughts and feedback. Going next year? Let us know what you want to learn! Comment below or let us know on Twitter: @AIUM_Ultrasound.

Peter Magnuson is AIUM’s Director of Communications and Member Services.

 

Life Hacks for the 2016 AIUM Annual Convention

The 2016 AIUM Annual Convention is less than a week away. Although it was about six months ago that we opened registration, that time just cruised by much too quickly. We here at the AIUM office just said goodbye to the truck full of convention goodies. Next time we see all that stuff, we will be in New York City.

For those meeting us there, here is what you need to know.

  1. Plan Now.

Final_Program-cover
If you haven’t started planning, what are you waiting for? The Program book and proceedings are online now so get busy.

  1. Get Slammed.

Print
AIUM is proud and excited to host its inaugural SonoSlam student competition. Teams from medical schools from across the country are competing for bragging rights and the Peter Arger Cup. If you have time, come check it out on Thursday, March 17.

  1. Speaking of Thursday, March 17…

st pat
Yep, it’s St. Patrick’s Day. And in New York City that means there is a parade. If you are coming in that day or trying to get around please allow yourself extra time. The parade starts at 11:00 AM.

  1. Give Me Internet.

wifi
There will be complimentary internet access on the exhibit hall floor. Select “Hilton Meeting Room Wifi” and enter code AIUM16. This only works on the exhibit hall floor.

  1. Now Get Social.

2016HKslides3
Follow and participate in all the action by using#AIUM16. We will be on Periscope, live tweeting the event, and sharing photos and videos.

  1. Stay Informed.

email
In addition to social media, the AIUM will be sending a daily eblast to all Convention registrants letting them know of any room changes and sharing the next day’s highlights. Keep a look out!

  1. Get Your Ribbons.

ribbon
You might notice that getting your Convention ribbons will be a bit different this year. While some might be in your materials, the AIUM has created a ribbon station where you can select those that pertain to you.

  1. Cases Go Digital.

ctd15
One of the most popular aspects of the AIUM Annual Convention is the Case-of-the-day Challenge. This year you will find these on dedicated computer kiosks on the Exhibit Hall Floor! Test your diagnostic skills!

  1. Run, For Fun

run
Join us on Friday, March 18 and Saturday, March 19 for a group run. Meet in the hotel lobby at 5:45 AM. Runners will leave promptly at 6:00 AM. Just one more way to see the city—plus you can network with fellow runners. All abilities welcomed!

We can’t wait to see you in New York City! Don’t forget to tag and share #AIUM16 on all your social media platforms.

Start Spreading the News

I have some very exciting news!

Are you ready?

The 2016 AIUM Annual Convention is moving to New York City and the New York Hilton Midtown! That’s right, the AIUM Convention is moving from Las Vegas to New York City.

aium16About a month ago, the AIUM was presented with an opportunity to return its signature event to New York City. Now, New York has always been a great city for the AIUM Annual Convention, but we were already committed to Las Vegas.

Before we explored the opportunity, however, we did some research. We looked at our existing city pattern, which didn’t have us returning to New York until at least 2022.  We reviewed the evaluations from the times we were in New York and found that attendees and exhibitors gave the city really high ratings. And, of course, we reviewed the terms of the offer.

With all of this positive feedback, we decided to pursue the opportunity a little further. In a move that even surprised us, Las Vegas was willing to release the AIUM from its commitment without any penalty. Another positive sign.

The only thing left to do was sign the final contract with New York—which we did this morning. The dates are now March 17-21, which also changes the day pattern to Thursday-Monday. While we know these changes might inconvenience some participants we believe that the return to New York, along with having the bulk of programming on the weekend, will allow even more AIUM members to attend.

We still have a lot of details to work out over the coming weeks so keep reading Sound Waves, checking www.aium.org, and reading your email. In the meantime, add the new dates to your calendar and circle October 14—that’s when registration and housing will officially open.

Oh, and help us out by spreading the news!

Keep watching AIUM’s communications for more information on this change. What do you love about NYC? Comment below or let us know on Twitter: @AIUM_Ultrasound.

Carmine M. Valente, PhD, CAE, is AIUM’s Chief Executive Officer. He is an avid Yankees fan.

The Highs and Lows From AIUM’s Annual Convention

It’s been a couple of weeks since we officially closed the 2015 AIUM Annual Convention hosting WFUMB. More than 1,300 people from 51 countries arrived in Orlando to hear from the experts, network with peers, and learn the latest technology.

And by the feedback we received, it looks like this year’s event delivered. That is not to say that there weren’t some issues—but overall the 2015 AIUM Annual Convention was a huge success. Just a few numbers from the post-Convention survey:convention

  • 94% of attendees said the overall Convention was good or excellent, which was the same as last year.
  • 70% of attendees said they would make at least some modification to what they are currently doing based on what they learned at the Convention.
  • 91% of attendees said they would recommend the AIUM Convention to a colleague.
  • 90% of attendees said the AIUM Convention was either on par or better than other ultrasound courses/events they have attended.
  • 91% of attendees said they spent time on the exhibit hall floor, with 95% rating the exhibit hall as either good or excellent.

Here’s what you liked
There were three main areas that consistently ranked high: the overall content of the Convention, the multidisciplinary nature of the event, and the food. Here are just a few quotes we received in response to the question, “What did you like most about this year’s Convention?”

  • “This was my first time with you. I loved everything.”
  • “Great variability in speakers’ backgrounds. Most conventions I go to are only one specific area of medicine, whereas AIUM had people from many different specialties.”
  • “Ability to collaborate at lunch–sitting at tables to discuss the conference presentations.”
  • “Wide variety of course selections. Excellent lectures and slides. Faculty put in much time and as a participant, I could tell.”
  • “Top-notch faculty and very practical clinically oriented lectures.”
  • “Welcoming atmosphere for a first-time presenter.”
  • “The mix of MDs, PhDs, and reps from manufacturers and government. Lunch format was also excellent to maximize opportunities for networking and interactions with colleagues.”

Not all wine and roses

  1. Room temperature. No, those weren’t hot flashes or cold spells. The hotel had a very difficult time adjusting and maintaining the temperature of the meeting rooms. To some extent this happens in every large venue, but the AIUM has already had discussions with the facility about this issue.
  2. Hotel issues. In fact, the AIUM collected all the comments we received about the hotel and sent them to our hotel representative. Don’t worry, we didn’t share your names, just your comments. These ranged from noise levels to the quality of the sleeping rooms to the Green Choice program. Just to clarify, the Green Choice program was not mandated by the AIUM but rather a guest choice on whether or not to participate. We were as unhappy as you were about how this program was delivered and have shared our displeasure with the hotel.
  3. Overflow hotel. As many attendees know, the AIUM sold out of its rooms at the Dolphin resort and we added rooms at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. We heard mixed reviews about this property and related transportation issues. We are actively addressing this now and hope to avoid a similar situation in 2017.
  4. Coffee. We heard it loud and clear that AIUM members need coffee! While there was coffee service in each room, we understand that most days require more than one cup! To that end we are taking a look at the schedule for next year to see what we can do.
  5. Handouts. We heard several comments about the lack of handouts or syllabi. The AIUM is looking into how we can do this for next year while ensuring that attendees have access to the most up-to-date presentations.
  6. Scheduling conflicts. The good thing about the high quality of the content at the AIUM Convention is that attendees want to go to more sessions than is humanly possible. The AIUM and the Annual Convention Committee make every effort to avoid overlap and duplication, but sometimes you do have to make a choice. Our goal is make sure that the choice you make results in learning!

The great thing about the Annual Convention is that we all learn. Attendees learn tips, techniques and resources that help them succeed and the AIUM learns how it can make this event even better. While the 2015 Annual Convention is over, we are already hard at work on the 2016 Annual Convention that will be held April 2-6 in Las Vegas.

Did you attend this year’s event? If so, share your thoughts and feedback. Going next year? Let us know what you want to learn! Comment below or let us know on Twitter: @AIUM_Ultrasound.

Peter Magnuson is AIUM’s Director of Communications and Member Services.

Life Hacks for the 2015 AIUM Annual Convention

The 2015 AIUM Annual Convention, hosting WFUMB, is less than a week away. Although it was about six months ago that we opened registration, that time just cruised by much too quickly. We here at the AIUM office just said goodbye to the truck full of convention goodies. Next time we see all that stuff, we will be in Orlando. For those of you meeting us there, here are a few things you should know.

  1. Plan now

 15_Final_Program.indd

If you haven’t started planning, what are you waiting for? The Program book and official proceedings are online now so get busy.

  1. Never go hungry   

image

We know that AIUM Convention attendees don’t go hungry so we aren’t really worried about that. However, you will need to find a place for dinner. There are numerous places within walking distance of the hotel. Check them all out here.

  1. What about the internet?

wifi

There will be complimentary internet access on the exhibit hall floor in the Dolphin Resort. In addition, if you are staying at the Dolphin, your resort fee includes in-room internet access as well as bottled water. So stay hydrated while you post all those cool photos and useful tips!

  1. Getting to and from

Transportation-options

Transportation can sometimes be a hassle, so it’s better to plan ahead. There are many options to get to and from the Orlando Airport and the Dolphin Resort and the choices depend on your budget and timing. Check out all the options here. If you are staying at the Animal Kingdom Lodge you do have access to Magical Express, but you will need to make a reservation. During the Convention there will be daily transportation between the Animal Kingdom and the Dolphin Resort.

  1. Let us hear your voice

karaoke_live

Of course we want you to complete the evaluation forms, but that’s not what we are talking about here. We are talking about the Dinner and Karaoke networking event. If you still need a ticket you can purchase them on site in the registration area.

  1. Get your ribbons

ribbon

You might notice that getting your Convention ribbons will be a bit different this year. While some might be in your materials, the AIUM has created a ribbon station where you can select those that pertain to you.

  1. Get extraterrestrial

Scott

There are a ton of sessions and heaps of learning that go on at an AIUM Convention. But this year don’t miss the Opening Plenary Session where Scott Dulchavsky, MD, PhD, will discuss the unique challenges and solutions associated with performing medical procedures in space!

  1. Cases Go Digital

ctd15

One of the most popular aspects of the AIUM Convention is the case of the day challenge. They are definitely back, but instead of jotting your diagnosis on paper (which frankly can be difficult to read), this year it will all be handled via text. All the instructions will be on site, but watch your autocorrect!

We can’t wait to see you in Orlando! Don’t forget to tag and share #AIUM15 on all your social media platforms.