The National Ultrasound Interest Group (NUSIG)

The National Ultrasound Interest Group (NUSIG) is a student-led organization founded in 2014 to promote ultrasound in undergraduate medical education. You may know us as the force behind planning national level events like SonoSlam. The bulk of NUSIG’s work, however, is sharing education and leadership resources between Ultrasound Interest Groups (USIGs) across the country. Each of the five regional representatives contact medical schools in their areas to exchange ideas, plan co-sponsored events, and see how NUSIG can assist them in evangelizing ultrasound.

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NUSIG provides everything from information on getting equipment and funding, to original educational content. Our podcast on iTunes (quickly closing on the 1,000 download mark) currently features a journal club series. Each episode is hosted by a different school evaluating an ultrasound-related article.

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Our next series is how to plan an Ultrafest, where we interview schools experienced in putting on these events. Our hope is that these USIGs can learn from each other, and other schools might be inspired to start their own UltraFest once it’s been laid out how. In the future, we aim to collect medical student level ultrasound lectures from across the country and publish them for anyone to view. Our vision is to serve as a central repository for the best medical student educational content available. Lastly, our twitter feed regularly features current ultrasound research articles, and retweets outstanding free open access medical education content.

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If you want to learn more about us or get involved, check out our website at www.nationalusig.com, and follow us on twitter and Facebook @NtlUSIG. You can find us on iTunes by searching for “NUSIG podcast.”

Are you a member of the National Ultrasound Interest Group? Did you attend this year’s SonoSlam? If so, share your thoughts and feedback. Comment below or let us know on Twitter: @AIUM_Ultrasound.

Mat Goebel is in charge of Social Media for the National Ultrasound Interest Group and is a medical student at University of California at San Diego.

Why SonoStuff.com?

Three reasons:

As a co-director of technology enabled active learning (TEAL) at the UC Davis school of medicine I incorporate important technologies into the medical curriculum, which has primarily been point of care ultrasound (POCUS). Ultrasound is an incredible medical education tool and curriculum integration tool. It can be used to teach, reinforce, and expand lessons in anatomy, physiology, pathology, physical exam, and the list goes on.

I knew there was a better way to teach medical students thaschick_photo_1n standing in front of the classroom and giving a lecture. Student’s need to learn hands-on, spatial reasoning, and critical thinking skills to become excellent physicians. Teaching clinically relevant topics with ultrasound in small groups with individualized instruction
is the best strategy. I needed to flip the classroom.

I started by creating online lectures for an introduction to ultrasound lecture, thoracic anatomy, and abdominal anatomy:

Introduction to Ultrasound, POCUS

FAST Focused Assessment of Sonography in Trauma Part 1

FAST Focused Assessment of Sonography in Trauma Part 2

Aorta Exam AAA POCUS

Introduction in Cardiac Ultrasound POCUS

Topics quickly grew in scope and depth. I initially housed my lectures on YouTube and emailed them out to students before the ultrasound laboratory sessions. However, I wanted a platform that allowed for improved organization and showcasing. I needed a single oschick_photo_2nline resource they could go to to find those materials I was making specific to their medical curriculum.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOhSjAZJnKpo8pP7ypvKDsw

Around the same time, during a weekly ultrasound quality assurance session in my emergency department I realized we were reviewing hundreds of scans each month and the reviewers were the only ones benefiting educationally from the process. Many cases were unique and important for education and patient care.

We began providing more feedback to our emergency sonographers and I decided I could use the same software I was using to develop material for the school of schick_photo_3medicine to highlight the most significant contributions to POCUS in our department every week. I quickly realized I needed a resource to house all these videos, one that anyone in my department could refer to when needed. The most efficient and creative method was to start a blog. I was discussing the project and possible names for the blog with colleagues and Dr. Sarah Medeiros said, “sounds like it’s a bunch of ultrasound stuff”. https://sonostuff.com was born.

I owe a great deal to free and open access to medical education or FOAMed. I was hungry for more POCUS education in residency and the ultrasoundpodcast.com came to the rescue. I became a local expert as a resident and even traveled to Tanzania to teach POCUS.

schick_photo_4I primarily began www.SonoStuff.com to organize and share with my department of emergency medicine and school of medicine, but it grew into a contribution to the growing body of amazing education resources that is FOAMed. I now use it as a resource in my global development work along with the many other FOAMed resources.

The work we all do in FOAMed, including AIUM’s the Scan, are an incredible and necessary resource. I have read the textbooks and attended the lectures, but I would not be where I am without FOAMed. I know all or most of those contributing to FOAMed do it out of love for education and patient care, without reimbursement or time off. Thank you to the many high-quality contributors and I am proud to play a small part in the FOAMed movement.schick_photo_5

Michael Schick, DO, MA, is Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at UC Davis Medical Center and Co-Director of Technology Enabled Active Learning, UC Davis School of Medicine. He is creator of www.sonostuff.com and can be reached on Twitter: ultrasoundstuff.

Interdisciplinary Education and Training in MSK Ultrasound

In my primary specialty of occupational medicine there is a need for practical education in musculoskeletal ultrasound for both diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic interventional guidance. Incorporation of this into education has begun recently and is continuing in the specialty. A wide variety of specialties are represented in occupational medicine, including many specialists who move into the field after a mid-career transition.

Interestingly, over the last few years clinicians have approached me and asked me to help them learn musculoskeletal ultrasound from many different disciplines outside of occupational medicine. These have included emergency medicine, orthopedics, rheumatology, sports medicine, family medicine, radiology, palliative care, and physical medicine and rehabilitation. When inquiring into why these clinicians are seeking training in this modality it seems that the consistent answer is thdr-sayeedat medical students are graduating and insisting on using ultrasound in their residency training. It would seem that many of our medical students are learning ultrasound at a rate that will outpace attending physician knowledge, exposure, and experience. Indeed, when teaching ultrasound to many of the medical students at West Virginia University as part of their medical education, I was astounded to see how proficient they were at using the machine, the transducer, and correctly identifying both normal and pathologic anatomy. It’s my understanding that many universities have included medical ultrasound into the academic curricula as a bridge to their respective gross anatomy courses and in their general clinical medical education.

Ultrasound is a modality utilized by many medical specialties for various indications. Several specialties outside of radiology, including the ones above, utilize ultrasound. Increasingly, residency programs are integrating ultrasound into their ACGME-accredited curriculum and, importantly, medical students are also learning the benefits of using the modality. It seems clear that despite the number of pitfalls, hurdles, and difficulties using ultrasound, the modality has proven to be an asset in clinical settings and has become a permanent fixture in hospital and clinical settings. The benefits of utilizing ultrasound have been well documented across many academic medical journals. I believe that medicine, as a whole, has done well to embrace the modality, however, there seems to be another vital step to take in the education arena to more fully integrate the modality into our patient’s care.

Currently, most education models for teaching ultrasound, whether it is for residents or medical students, involves grouping like kind together. Emergency residents learn it in the emergency medicine didactics. Physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) residents learn it from demonstrations in their own didactics, and so on. Perhaps approaching the curriculum from a more inclusive perspective, however, would be more beneficial for residents and fellows. I, personally, had experience teaching an integrated musculoskeletal course at West Virginia University. The idea, admittedly, was born out of necessity. Physicians experienced in ultrasound from sports medicine, emergency medicine and occupational medicine created and executed a curriculum to teach musculoskeletal ultrasound and invited residents from other specialties. The interest we were able to garner quite frankly surprised me. Although the curriculum was targeted to occupational medicine residents the interest in using musculoskeletal ultrasound was widespread. Residents from specialties like emergency medicine, radiology, family medicine, internal medicine, and orthopedics attended our sessions.

While the course was a success, introducing an integrated curriculum across medical specialties posed a new set of challenges. My specialty was able to use dedicated didactic time for the education but many other specialties have disparate educational time. Many residents could not make all of the sessions and many more could not make any sessions because of fixed residency schedules. This makes coordination very difficult. As I have pondered this over the last few months I believe that educational leaders should begin to form structured educational collaborative time for activities like education in musculoskeletal ultrasound. Each discipline will be able to contribute to teaching to ensure high quality evidence-based curriculum for residents learning ultrasound. Each discipline has their individual strengths and collaboration ensures coordination and even learning amongst instructors. Integrating medicine has been a goal of thought leaders in medicine at the very highest levels and can be replicated for the instruction and training of our resident physicians.

Another option is to allow residents to attend the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine’s annual conference where interdisciplinary education in ultrasound occurs. This conference even has a day for collegial competition among medical students and schools. In fact, the courses are created to encourage engagement in the education and training of clinicians at all levels of training. The overall goal is to advance the education and training in this modality and hope that education leaders begin to encourage collaboration in a much larger scale thus achieving integrated medical care that provides a building block to lead to high quality evidence-based medical care for our patients, families, and communities.

What other areas of ultrasound education have room to grow? How would you recommend making changes? Do you have any stories from your own education to share? Comment below or let us know on Twitter: @AIUM_Ultrasound.

Yusef Sayeed, MD, MPH, MEng, CPH, is a Fellow at Deuk Spine Institute, Melbourne, FL.

An Idea Whose Time Has Come

By all accounts, French writer Victor Hugo wasn’t talking about ultrasound in medical education when he wrote these words. But fast forward a little more than two centuries and they seem more than fitting.

Med_Ed_Forum_Logo-blueRecent years have seen a reformation of medical school education, something many have argued is long overdue given the changes in medicine and medical practice in the last two decades. Multiple medical schools are actively changing their curricula and many are incorporating novel educational strategies to teach medical students more efficiently and to focus on less esoteric topics. In perhaps a perfect storm during this same period the accuracy of the physical examination is being questioned more than ever while over reliance on imaging and increased radiation exposure are being linked to increased costs and future mortality. Ultrasound has long been proposed by advocates as a critical tool to help address these concerns but in medical education especially, it may be an ideal tool for future physicians.

Ultrasound as taught in a point-of-care setting, or performed at the bedside, can be incorporated into almost every clinical specialty. Its uses range from procedure guidance to focused diagnostic applications allowing accurate bedside diagnosis of multiple disease states. In addition, it is proving to be an excellent adjunct in teaching basic science topics such as anatomy and physiology. Recent literature, representing just the proverbial tip of the iceberg, suggests that ultrasound is superior to the physical examination even if that exam is done by an expert. Additionally, ultrasound helps novices, known as medical students, better learn the basics needed for all medical professions. Given all of this information it is imperative to have a national conversation regarding ultrasound integration into medical school education.

It is with this backdrop that last year, the AIUM and the Society of Ultrasound in Medical Education (SUSME) convened a conference to discuss the state of ultrasound in medical education and to ultimately craft a roadmap for its integration. Forty-two medical schools, 64 attendees, and 13 faculty gathered in New York City to begin this work.

At the outset, it was clear that the level of integration varied among medical schools, with some being fully integrated, some just starting, and others still exploring. But this fact led credence to the need for this event which started with a series of discussions and presentations covering a variety of topics. Ultrasound education leaders discussed how to get started, how to overcome pitfalls and barriers, and where to find support and funding. Many corresponding resources can be found on the AIUM’s MedEd Portal.

Participants then had a hands-on scanning experience with simulation and live models that was designed to show how and where they could integrate medical ultrasound education. This was followed by roundtable discussions during which participants could share their experiences, ask questions, and focus on next steps.

One of the highlights of the event was the students’ perspective. A number of students shared how medical ultrasound education helped them develop confidence and a skill that could be used for them to teach attendings, other students and practitioners across the world.  Their enthusiasm and energy definitely created a positive and exciting atmosphere.

The participants came away with a shared understanding that it makes sense to prepare the next generation of clinicians and physicians with the skills and understanding of how and when to use medical ultrasound. However, challenges remain.

Multiple barriers exist and many Deans, associate Deans and other tasked with curricula development are not familiar with current point of care ultrasound use.  Additional barriers such as when, where and how to integrate ultrasound into a 4-year curriculum may appear to be unsurmountable, yet have been solved in multiple medical schools already. The collection and efficient distribution of this knowledge is seen as critical to the further spread of ultrasound in medical education and the unprecedented bringing together of multiple basic science and clinical educators.

This event was the first step in opening up the discussion and sharing common resources, challenges and solutions. The second Ultrasound in Medical Education Forum is scheduled to take place May 31-June 1 at the University of California, Irvine. The event is by invitation, but if you know someone who might be interested, please forward their contact information to Glynis Harvey at gharvey@aium.org.

If you are associated with a medical school, how have you integrated ultrasound? If you are a student, what do you think about teaching ultrasound in your classes? Comment below or let us know on Twitter: @AIUM_Ultrasound.

Steven R. Goldstein, MD, is AIUM’s Immediate Past President.

* The 2014 event was underwritten by industry partners and a grant from the Endowment for Education and Research.